Glengarry Glen Ross (Blu-ray FuturePak) [Germany]

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C.C. 95

The Snarky Assassin
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#2
Sweet! Man- I hope it's a box set with a set of steak knives!
 

augustus

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#3
Listed and available to order from amazon.de. This is the link.

http://www.amazon.de/dp/B011X2O17Q/?tag=hidefnin0d-21

I'm also uploading the image of the confirmed artwork from Amazon's page, as it is of better quality than that shown in the OP.

911QQDg9MTL._SL1500_.jpg

I shall definitely be obtaining this. Thanks @JasonV125 for bringing this release to my attention.
 

C.C. 95

The Snarky Assassin
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#4
Listed and available to order from amazon.de. This is the link.

http://www.amazon.de/dp/B011X2O17Q/?tag=hidefnin0d-21

I'm also uploading the image of the confirmed artwork from Amazon's page, as it is of better quality than that shown in the OP.

View attachment 176723

I shall definitely be obtaining this. Thanks @JasonV125 for bringing this release to my attention.
@augustus, do you think this going to be solely an Amazon.de release? Or do you anticipate it showing up in other countries with other retailers?
 

augustus

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#5
@augustus, do you think this going to be solely an Amazon.de release? Or do you anticipate it showing up in other countries with other retailers?
Apparently, this isn't an Amazon exclusive. According to the German and Austrian forums, it will be a general release, albeit only in the German speaking countries.

As for other countries, there was a Steelbook release in the UK in 2012, now OOP. Most other countries are still waiting on a Blu-ray release, let alone one in the Steelbook or FuturePak formats. So it's not looking likely at the moment.

It's strange that a critically acclaimed film with a screenplay by David Mamet and a stellar cast, including such luminaries as Al Pacino, Kevin Spacey, Jack Lemmon, et al, should be treated so shabbily. I can only assume that it is down to it being an independent production, outside of the studio system.

In any event, I shall be getting the German release. I don't share the animosity towards FuturePaks that is so prevalent on this forum. I was also quite impressed with the last Turbine Medien FuturePak that I obtained, which was "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre" (1974), so have great hopes for this release.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help, but this is one title where logic is of absolutely no assistance in determining what is likely to happen, as regards future releases.
 

C.C. 95

The Snarky Assassin
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#6
Apparently, this isn't an Amazon exclusive. According to the German and Austrian forums, it will be a general release, albeit only in the German speaking countries.

As for other countries, there was a Steelbook release in the UK in 2012, now OOP. Most other countries are still waiting on a Blu-ray release, let alone one in the Steelbook or FuturePak formats. So it's not looking likely at the moment.

It's strange that a critically acclaimed film with a screenplay by David Mamet and a stellar cast, including such luminaries as Al Pacino, Kevin Spacey, Jack Lemmon, et al, should be treated so shabbily. I can only assume that it is down to it being an independent production, outside of the studio system.

In any event, I shall be getting the German release. I don't share the animosity towards FuturePaks that is so prevalent on this forum. I was also quite impressed with the last Turbine Medien FuturePak that I obtained, which was "The Texas Chain Saw Massacre" (1974), so have great hopes for this release.

Sorry I couldn't be of more help, but this is one title where logic is of absolutely no assistance in determining what is likely to happen, as regards future releases.
Thanks, @augustus! Naw- that is enough of an info dump for me to work with! I agree with what you said. With this being Barnes & Noble 50% off Criterion month- I feel like I am annually dissapointed that the Criterion editions of Mamet's Homicide and House of Games are still not on Criterion Blu ray (only DVD). I personally think they should do a box set like the Jacques Tati or Jacques Demy collections... And fill it with others like The Spanish Prisoner, Oleanna, Winslow Boy, and even the Cable special Ricky Jay and His 52 Assistants (a real treat!). Geez- do you remember how great a movie Things Chance was? Most people probably have never heard of it.
In this age of CGI and Superheroes, I find myself in a position I never thought I would be in...The guy who misses the "old stuff". Stuff that was like live theater on celluloid. Explosive dialog and acting. I love a great blockbuster like anyone else...but I find myself aching for stuff like the Mamet movies. Or even to a lesser extent- John Dahl's early potboilers like Red Rock West, or Barry Levinson's Bugsy. Hell, even Goodfellas and Casino seem like a shot of adrenaline for the hardcore cinephile when you catch it on cable by accident late at night! And those weren't that long ago. No one writes like Mamet. There's not even any wannabe-Mamets out there right now. And that is a shame. Name the last bit of unbelievably great dialog you heard in a movie, and you'll find yourself racking your brain for a long time. It'll be fun to watch and listen to Glengarry Glen Ross again! It has been a long time.
 

augustus

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#7
Thanks, @augustus! Naw- that is enough of an info dump for me to work with! I agree with what you said. With this being Barnes & Noble 50% off Criterion month- I feel like I am annually dissapointed that the Criterion editions of Mamet's Homicide and House of Games are still not on Criterion Blu ray (only DVD). I personally think they should do a box set like the Jacques Tati or Jacques Demy collections... And fill it with others like The Spanish Prisoner, Oleanna, Winslow Boy, and even the Cable special Ricky Jay and His 52 Assistants (a real treat!). Geez- do you remember how great a movie Things Chance was? Most people probably have never heard of it.
In this age of CGI and Superheroes, I find myself in a position I never thought I would be in...The guy who misses the "old stuff". Stuff that was like live theater on celluloid. Explosive dialog and acting. I love a great blockbuster like anyone else...but I find myself aching for stuff like the Mamet movies. Or even to a lesser extent- John Dahl's early potboilers like Red Rock West, or Barry Levinson's Bugsy. Hell, even Goodfellas and Casino seem like a shot of adrenaline for the hardcore cinephile when you catch it on cable by accident late at night! And those weren't that long ago. No one writes like Mamet. There's not even any wannabe-Mamets out there right now. And that is a shame. Name the last bit of unbelievably great dialog you heard in a movie, and you'll find yourself racking your brain for a long time. It'll be fun to watch and listen to Glengarry Glen Ross again! It has been a long time.
@C.C. 95

It's well past my bedtime and I need to be up in a few hours time, as I'm off to see "Far From the Madding Crowd" at my local cinema. Thomas Vinterberg's 2015 remake, as opposed to John Schlesinger's 1967 original. So there is still good drama being produced. It's just that the Marvel films seem to get all the attention.

Other than that, I'll content myself with agreeing with what you have written about both David Mamet and "Glengarry Glen Ross", and bid you Good Night.
 
Oct 13, 2013
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#8
Some more Infomation:

- It will be limited to 2000 pieces and it will be numberd on the backsite of the j-card
- It will be glossy
 

augustus

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#9
In this age of CGI and Superheroes, I find myself in a position I never thought I would be in...The guy who misses the "old stuff". Stuff that was like live theater on celluloid. Explosive dialog and acting. I love a great blockbuster like anyone else...but I find myself aching for stuff like the Mamet movies.
@C.C. 95 Revisiting this thread and your post brought to mind the interview with Orson Welles in which he stated,

"I always begin with the dialogue. And I do not understand how one dares to write action before dialogue. It's a very strange conception. I know that in theory the word is secondary in cinema but the secret of my work is that everything is based on the word. I do not make silent films. I must begin with what the characters say. I must know what they say before seeing them do what they do." (Orson Welles Interviews Edited by Mark W. Estrin).

All the wannabe directors, who think that the way to revitalize flagging interest in their movies is to throw in a car chase and some explosions, should take note.

Yet it doesn't need to be an either-or situation. You only have to look at such classics as David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" or William Wyler's "Ben-Hur" to see that it's possible, with a great director and an intelligent script, to effortlessly blend intimate personal drama with lavish large scale spectacle.

 
Last edited:
#10
@C.C. 95 Revisiting this thread and your post brought to mind the interview with Orson Welles in which he stated,

"I always begin with the dialogue. And I do not understand how one dares to write action before dialogue. It's a very strange conception. I know that in theory the word is secondary in cinema but the secret of my work is that everything is based on the word. I do not make silent films. I must begin with what the characters say. I must know what they say before seeing them do what they do." (Orson Welles Interviews Edited by Mark W. Estrin).

All the wannabe directors, who think that the way to revitalize flagging interest in their movies is to throw in a car chase and some explosions, should take note.

Yet it doesn't need to be an either-or situation. You only have to look at such classics as David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" or William Wyler's "Ben-Hur" to see that it's possible, with a great director and an intelligent script, to effortlessly blend intimate personal drama with lavish large scale spectacle.
Sadly writers are a despised breed in Hollywood. They will do anything and everything to build up the cult of the 'Director'!
In the old days the writer was king, and rightly so. Scripts were written in British Standard, which, for the unitiated, is very much like book format. Diirection was written by the writer. After all, the dictionary definition of a screenplay to this day describes it thus: the written form of a movie that includes instructions on how it is to be acted and filmed.

The introduction of Hollywood Format essentially attempted to wrestle control from the writer - who, if remotely competent knows how it should be done better than anyone. But limit his control they did by:
A. Limiting the actual writing to a narrow scroll down the middle of the page (to facilitate bone ilde producers skip-reading habits, Ditto lazy actors
B. Eliminating direction,as discussed previously.
and
C. Limiting the actual script to One minute per page - and peferably much less.

To put this in context, the majority of the greatest ever screenplays were written in Briitish Format or a close approximation, and would never even get read these days due to format and bulk!
As the great Robert Towne put it: Chinatown would never get made these days. It's far too long for a start (as Polanski said himself it is something over 180 pages), and shoots well above the head of the target audience these days!

The only way around this is to be an Auteur, find yourself a seriously pushy agent, or find a producer who actually likes you.

Overall, this explains in large part why great films these days are so thin on the ground.

Another reason is actually the directors themselves. frankly the only ones who are any good on their own merits started out as writers, or behind a camera.
The rest of them rely heavily on a skilled Cinematographer such as Jack Cardiff, and Arthur Ibbetson to name but two.
Those two men, in all but name, directed every film they worked on as Cinematographer. They worked with some legendary directors, who habitually leaned on their skills to frame and light shots, place actors etc. correctly time and again. Cardiff and Ibbetson would even habitually call the cuts.

As I have always said, if you have a good script written in the correct manner, then give me a skilled Cinematographer, the director is superfluous!

What Welles was really getting at is that before you can picture that amazing tracking shot sequence (in your head) which opens Touch Of Evil for example, you really have to know your protagonists - not just what they say, but how they look, think and speak, only then can you add the fancy peripherals . . . .
 

C.C. 95

The Snarky Assassin
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Sep 10, 2014
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#11
@C.C. 95 Revisiting this thread and your post brought to mind the interview with Orson Welles in which he stated,

"I always begin with the dialogue. And I do not understand how one dares to write action before dialogue. It's a very strange conception. I know that in theory the word is secondary in cinema but the secret of my work is that everything is based on the word. I do not make silent films. I must begin with what the characters say. I must know what they say before seeing them do what they do." (Orson Welles Interviews Edited by Mark W. Estrin).

All the wannabe directors, who think that the way to revitalize flagging interest in their movies is to throw in a car chase and some explosions, should take note.

Yet it doesn't need to be an either-or situation. You only have to look at such classics as David Lean's "Lawrence of Arabia" or William Wyler's "Ben-Hur" to see that it's possible, with a great director and an intelligent script, to effortlessly blend intimate personal drama with lavish large scale spectacle.
Sadly writers are a despised breed in Hollywood. They will do anything and everything to build up the cult of the 'Director'!
In the old days the writer was king, and rightly so. Scripts were written in British Standard, which, for the unitiated, is very much like book format. Diirection was written by the writer. After all, the dictionary definition of a screenplay to this day describes it thus: the written form of a movie that includes instructions on how it is to be acted and filmed.

The introduction of Hollywood Format essentially attempted to wrestle control from the writer - who, if remotely competent knows how it should be done better than anyone. But limit his control they did by:
A. Limiting the actual writing to a narrow scroll down the middle of the page (to facilitate bone ilde producers skip-reading habits, Ditto lazy actors
B. Eliminating direction,as discussed previously.
and
C. Limiting the actual script to One minute per page - and peferably much less.

To put this in context, the majority of the greatest ever screenplays were written in Briitish Format or a close approximation, and would never even get read these days due to format and bulk!
As the great Robert Towne put it: Chinatown would never get made these days. It's far too long for a start (as Polanski said himself it is something over 180 pages), and shoots well above the head of the target audience these days!

The only way around this is to be an Auteur, find yourself a seriously pushy agent, or find a producer who actually likes you.

Overall, this explains in large part why great films these days are so thin on the ground.

Another reason is actually the directors themselves. frankly the only ones who are any good on their own merits started out as writers, or behind a camera.
The rest of them rely heavily on a skilled Cinematographer such as Jack Cardiff, and Arthur Ibbetson to name but two.
Those two men, in all but name, directed every film they worked on as Cinematographer. They worked with some legendary directors, who habitually leaned on their skills to frame and light shots, place actors etc. correctly time and again. Cardiff and Ibbetson would even habitually call the cuts.

As I have always said, if you have a good script written in the correct manner, then give me a skilled Cinematographer, the director is superfluous!

What Welles was really getting at is that before you can picture that amazing tracking shot sequence (in your head) which opens Touch Of Evil for example, you really have to know your protagonists - not just what they say, but how they look, think and speak, only then can you add the fancy peripherals . . . .
Well spoken guys!:thumbs: Although, Jack, I love Jack Cardiff- but I strongly doubt he took over directing duties from
Powell & Pressburger on Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes, and Stairway to Heaven! Or Huston on the African Queen! I highly recommend the documentary CAMERAMAN: The life and work of Jack Cardiff. The guy was a stone cold genius on the camera.
And I have been meaning to revisit the great documentary VISIONS OF LIGHT again too.:thumbs:
 
#12
Well spoken guys!:thumbs: Although, Jack, I love Jack Cardiff- but I strongly doubt he took over directing duties from
Powell & Pressburger on Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes, and Stairway to Heaven! Or Huston on the African Queen! I highly recommend the documentary CAMERAMAN: The life and work of Jack Cardiff. The guy was a stone cold genius on the camera.
And I have been meaning to revisit the great documentary VISIONS OF LIGHT again too.:thumbs:
I've seen the documentary, also actually had the very great fortune to meet Jack Cardiff at a BFI bash some years ago. Some time before that I also met Michael Powell a couple of years before he passed on. Jack Cardiff would never sing his own praises - Michael Powell on the other hand never stopped. There are, to quote him, Scenes in every film we worked on together that owe everything to Jack.

Maybe it's a little strong to say he and Arthur Ibbetson actually drected en masse - but they certainly did more than their fair share. According to Charles Grodin, Arthur Ibbetson should have been credited as co-director in ther one outing together -11 HarrowHouse.

Frankly, no cannot see Huston surrendering contol to anyone - in fact he tended to influence everyone else (writer at heart, he couldn't stop himself, I suppose); then again, he couldn't possibly have treated Jack Cardiff as hired help - that would ever have worked.
 
Oct 13, 2013
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#13
Here some pictures of the Glengarry Glen Ross Futurepak.
Its glossy and limited to 2000 copies (numbered on the backside of the J-Card)

glengarry_pak_5 (Medium).JPG
 

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