4K HDR Blu-ray in 2018: HDR10+ And Other Developments

Savage Clown

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Courtesy of 4K News

The 4K Blu-ray disc format has enjoyed some rather solid success since it first emerged for the consumer market in March of 2016. The combination of market timing that involved rising ultra HD TV sales, a dearth of broadly sourced 4K content options and easy accessibility for 4K Blu-ray discs themselves (partly due to a lack of the regional playback restrictions found in the older HD Blu-ray format) have all come together to make 4K Blu-ray disc releases into brisk sellers. Even Blu-ray Disc Association chairman Victor Matsuda was recently prompted to state that the format’s success has come as a “pleasant surprise” to many in his industry.

These were the words used by Matsuda in a conversation with the website HDTVTest during an interview at CES 2018 held in January of this year. During their conversation with the BD Association chief, numerous other interesting themes about the future of the format and its HDR prospects were also brought up.

Most importantly based on the HDTVTest report, UHD Blu-ray will also be getting support the recently unveiled HDR10+ high dynamic range format that has been developed through leadership by Samsung and other companies. This will be coming sooner or later in 2018. 4K Blu-ray already offers support for the widely used HDR10 format and some discs also come with Dolby Vision high dynamic range for the TVs that support it, but HDR10+ was until very recently a relative unknown in the high dynamic range format competition on the content and TV display market. The HDR10+ format was developed by Samsung and others to address deficiencies in HDR10 and thus more effectively compete with the superior Dolby Vision standard. It offers a cheap, open source and royalty-free method of integrating high dynamic range for color and contrast in 4K Blu-ray (or streaming media) content that it has been designated for consumer market release.

The older HDR10 standard has enjoyed wide popularity in both 4K content and 4K displays with HDR due to its ease of implementation and the low cost of adding it. HDR10+ will offer the same benefits but with the added bonus of superior visual specs for color/contrast in any content source or TV that adopts it. This will make it more of an effective competitor to Dolby Vision which, while better at HDR rendering, is also proprietary and thus expensive to use.

Matsuda and TV industry representatives are of course also hoping that HDR in a general sense gains more consumer familiarity in 2018. Findings by market research firm FutureSource have shown that while at least 75% of consumers on the U.S market know about 4K ultra HD resolution and TVs, only some 44% know about high dynamic range and what it means for digital video. To counter this lower level of familiarity, the BDA has started releasing videos that explain what HDR means on its own website and to major digital media platforms like YouTube.

Beyond HDR10, it’s cousin HDR10+ and the Dolby Vision HDR format (developed by Dolby Labs and now also supported by most brands of 4K UHD TV but few content sources) other high dynamic range standards also exist that aren’t quite as widely used yet. One of these is called Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) and it’s being implemented as a broadcast-fed source of HDR mastering for select sources of content. Developed by the BBC and Japan’s national broadcasting giant NHK, the HLG format is designed to be mastered into content that can then be easily sent via cable or broadcast television sources as well as over the internet. Many of the 4K HDR TVs released by almost all of the major brands in 2017 and into 2018 offer or will offer HLG support as well.

Other even lesser known HDR formats include the Philips Technicolor standard, developed by both Philips and (you guessed it) Technicolor. Also called the SL-HDR2 standard, Philips Technicolor is actually also supported by Blu-ray Disc but barely used by any content makers or supported by many 4K TVs so far.

In addition to surprisingly good and growing sales of 4K Blu-ray disc titles, 4K Blu-ray players themselves have been getting lots of traction as well in 2017. Sales of these devices have expanded 133% for this last year and the range of different models has expanded a lot, with many brands offering multiple different models and extremely well-known media devices like the Xbox One S and One X consoles coming with built-in 4K Blu-ray players of their own. This of course increases awareness of 4K Blu-ray and as a result, awareness of the HDR that goes into nearly all UHD Blu-ray discs.

Finally, going back to the core of all Blu-ray talk, the movies themselves, talks between Matsuda and HDTVTest covered the expanding selection of content offerings that’s making this format so popular and as a result feeding the release of even more movies in 4K UHD HDR Blu-ray. This self reinforcing cycle has led to a growth in the number of available titles from 110 at the end of 2016 to well over 250 by the end of 2017. This is a far cry from the sheer number of HD content options available to anyone today but by the standards of 4K UHD content, these 4K high dynamic range disc options cover a nice chunk of available entertainment, especially for people without access to streaming broadband internet powerful enough for 4K UHD streaming from sources like Netflix or Amazon Prime.

Also interesting is the quantity of 4K Blu-ray disc releases of older movies with new HDR and 4K formatting built into them. For one thing, these kinds of movies flesh out the overall selection of 4K Blu-ray titles available into something that can appeal to multiple tastes, not just fans of new release blockbuster titles. And secondly, that these films continue to be released moving into 2018 shows a wider purchase-justifying consumer demand for the quality of the 4K HDR BD format for old movies already seen on DVD or VHS.

Now almost all of the titles available via 4K UHD Blu-ray are also available through streaming media 4K content sources like Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Vudu, Hulu and numerous others. The selection of streaming UHD entertainment is if anything even bigger than what a person can get via 4K Blu-ray. However, where this physical media format still has room for growth is among consumers who either can’t get access to a fast enough internet connection for 4K streaming or whose geographical location limits their access to streaming content options due to DRM restrictions by studios.

In the U.S alone, nearly 75% of internet users don’t have the minimum 25Mbps connectivity speeds recommended by most streamed 4K content providers for smooth viewing, and on the DRM side of things, 4K Blu-ray discs are playable worldwide, with no regional encoding, allowing, for example, a Pakistani tourist on vacation in NYC to buy all the UHD BD movies they like without worries about enjoying them back home.

On a final note, based on what we’re hearing from the BDA chair about the future of the 4K Blu-ray format, there are going to be plenty of new and exciting developments in 2018. These discs aren’t going anywhere forgotten quite yet.
4k.jpg
 
Jul 20, 2016
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not disputing this, but adding to this and your mention of DVD stats earlier. having traveled far and wide to many parts of the USA. I can tell you this .... DVD is still very popular because you have MANY MANY MANY "country" and "rural" areas that these folks do not care about the quality. If they have the bug, itch, or urge to want to watch a movie (based off a trailer from tv etc) then DVD is just fine for them. Most these people do NOT purchase DVDs unless we are talking about $5 bins at walmart and black friday $2-3 dvds etc.. Instead they rent them from video stores like Family Video and red box machines. Those companies attribute to the large sales of DVDs.

That is the psyche of those people, and the areas in which they live. And they love it, and dont want that to change. Their town is "country" and thats hey they want to keep it. etc. Because the USA is the largest consumer market in the world that is why it accounts for so much dvd sales etc.

All that above, will only have a natural progression to blu-ray as the players are very cheap now and those types of people dont run off to upgrade their tvs or players unless they break. Most have at least 1080p tvs now .... and with blu-ray prices getting cheaper both to own and also to rent, etc. the natural progression for these people will be blu-ray, and in cases where the internet is fast enough etc. and someone is tech savvy enough they'll maybe get netflix etc. The problem with those people is (well, not a problem) but never the less those people cant seem to justify a subscription service when they already have cable tv or if they dont have cable at all. They dont typically watch alot of movies , and thus renting just seems the way to do so. And for the towns with video stores there's alot of older folks who just like that interaction. I still have video stores in my town and as much as I love my childhood with blockbusters I just rarely ever visit Family Video. But many folks still do.

When it comes to people buying DVD's and still renting at video stores I guess it depends on where you live.
I live in a city about 45 minutes away from downtown Toronto, Canada. I believe there are about 200,000 people here.
Video stores no longer exist here. The vending machine style rental boxes have all disappeared as well.

Even the used stores here that sell DVD's for a $1.00 and Blu-rays for $2.99 have all stopped buying DVD's from the public because people have stopped buying them and there are too many sitting on the shelves. Most of the time I can't even find a decent used blu-ray title anymore. Less and less used blu-rays are showing up in the used stores.
 

C.C. 95

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Yes 4K content is increasing but 4K UHD disc sales is tiny compared to 4K UHD digital purchases.

4K UHD is not going away it's about how it's been purchased and viewed

There will always be those that want physical discs for better picture and sound I purchase most my releases that way but in general how video and music is been purchased and viewed has changed compared to a few years ago.
Again: this is not an EITHER/OR situation.
 

C.C. 95

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Here are my thoughts based on no articles, statistics or facts :LOL:

I think everything probably depends on the age of the consumer. I would guess that the people who buy most of the physical movies would be older. I would guess that most of the people in this thread are 40 or older. I'm 49 and I have been buying movies since my teens.

Kids today, and that includes people in their 20's, still like going to movies with friends as a night out I'm guessing. But as for buying physical movies? I don't know about that. Perhaps they buy digital copies.. I take public transit and I see a lot of students (high school and college aged) watching shows on their laptops and their phones. I would never watch anything on a phone, not even a Youtube video. I won't watch a movie on a laptop. Too small.

I just don't think the majority of kids today care as much about the quality of the sound and picture of movies outside of a theatre.
I think they are content with streaming and whatever comes up on the TV. I just don't think they are going to be the ones buying physical media or collecting movies. I believe they are content downloading and streaming and Netflixing (has anybody coined that term yet?) With all of the content out there now (television shows and movies on cable networks) I just don't think they will really need or want to watch the same movies over again.

Nostalgia has been mentioned. That's why we collect our favourite shows and movies. Because when we were younger we couldn't instantly own our favourite movies and TV shows. It took years before they were available. Today it takes 3 months. Unless you download a pirated vision.

Kids of course are too young for nostalgia. They don't know a time when they couldn't instantly get a hold of a movie or a TV show.
You can download a TV show the day after it airs. Same with a movie in the theatre.

Anyway the kids today are not going to be buyers of physical movies and TV shows tomorrow.
It will all be downloading, streaming and digital buying.

For this reason I believe that buying movies and TV shows on physical media will indeed die someday.
It will die with us.
There are Hundreds upon hundreds of movies that exist on DVD that DO NOT exist on digital media. They just don't.
Digital media is finite in what they put up.
There are tons of movies and TV that exist on film that don't exist on DVD.
There tons of movies and TV that exist on DVD but not on Blu ray.
There are tons of movies and TV that exist on Blu ray but not UHD.
AND TONS of all of the above that do NOT exist in digital streaming.
Every iteration Has to play CATCH-UP.
Streaming blows for me - it NEVER has stuff I am looking for. (And they don't ADD to their lineup. THEY ROTATE THINGS OUT)
Quality issues aside - Streaming is not this great utopia it is made out to be.
 
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Jul 20, 2016
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There are Hundreds upon hundreds of movies that exist on DVD that DO NOT exist on digital media. They just don't.
Digital media is finite in what they put up.
There are tons of movies and TV that exist on film that don't exist on DVD.
There tons of movies and TV that exist on DVD but not on Blu ray.
There are tons of movies and TV that exist on Blu ray but not UHD.
AND TONS of all of the above that do NOT exist in digital streaming.
Every iteration Has to play CATCH-UP.
Streaming blows for me - it NEVER has stuff I am looking for. (And they don't ADD to their lineup. THEY ROTATE THINGS OUT)
Quality issues aside - Streaming is not this great utopia it is made out to be.

True but the kids today will never seek these past titles out. We will, but after us...

And by the time the kids of today are ready for movie and television nostalgia, if ever, it will most likely exist in some other yet-to-be invented format...and most likely not in a space stealing physical format.

Perhaps every movie and TV show will already come downloaded into their new supercomputer, iphone 39 or 32K UUUHD television with the gazillion TB hard drive.
 

C.C. 95

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True but the kids today will never seek these past titles out. We will, but after us...

And by the time the kids of today are ready for movie and television nostalgia, if ever, it will most likely exist in some other yet-to-be invented format...and most likely not in a space stealing physical format.

Perhaps every movie and TV show will already come downloaded into their new supercomputer, iphone 39 or 32K UUUHD television with the gazillion TB hard drive.
I don't think kids today will be any different then we are. I don't think there is this sudden change where all of a sudden nobody younger than 30 has no interest in film history. Why would that be true?
I have friends who are Millennials who love classic Hollywood. (I'm talking 1930s and up).
Last time I checked, 40 and 50 year old films are very much loved by "the kids" (Star Wars, Raiders, Godfather, Taxi Driver, Apocalypse Now, etc.)
Btw- one can't be nostalgic for a time they never lived in, so I don't really like applying that term.
As kids get older (myself included) they begin to realize that great stories are timeless. The perception that things are different now re: "kids", is only because we are in a cycle where the business model is aimed directly at a certain age group ("the kids").
The difference is classic film will still be around and(sadly) many of today's digital films may no longer be with us in 100 years.
The elephant in the room:
https://spectrum.ieee.org/consumer-...will-todays-digital-movies-exist-in-100-years
https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing...ollywood-archivists-cant-outpace-obsolescence
 
I agree with what you are saying @C.C. 95 but the only big differnce with the kids today is that why yes you will have some that seek out film and film history etc. That'll never stop. However 20 years ago there was no YouTube. There is a large amount of kids who instead of only having tv and movies also have the option to watch random vlogger videos and by the simple availability of more options in regards to media you create more habits by the younger generation in how they consume it.

My daughter who loves movies, and I try to impress on her the importance of films, the experience etc. As much as she does truly enjoy all that, she has no problem in just laying in bed watching crap on her phone. Times I catch her on netflix etc on her phone. All the while there is plenty of tv's in the house with a bigger screen and better sound to watch this all. Its just that habit of growing up with phones and its good enough for them. I find it crazy. ha.

Where I believe the future is heading is where we will truly suffer. I own an Oculus Go, and while its impressive, what is more impressive is what it will be in the future as they get better and better with VR. its not perfect yet video quality wise, but its very good. Hollywood doesnt like the strangle hold (at times) that theaters have. Sadly I definitely see VR as being theater killers in the future.

I had a PR firm send me some stuff they wanted me to post about and promote in that it was VR and basically it was people logging in together sitting at their home in virtual theaters watching the new movies. While I can understand the pro's of that ... its still kind of sad to think about. I dont think you can ever kill off the true experience of watching a movie in a crowd of people, but one has to think that 20 years from now when its all super amazing quality and online rooms where you likely will be able to still hear audience laughter etc. but have the ability to mute the annoying dude that it will no doubt kill off many theaters. There has already been live streamed Q&A's with Directors to other theaters and being to tap that into an online experience outside of the theaters with being able to sell many more tickets is something I see them doing for the dollars. But if big theaters cant put butts in seats they will lose too much money for the real estate and thus smaller theaters are likely the future.

It'll be interesting to watch it all progress in my lifetime. There is a theaters association tho so I'm sure they wont go out without a fight.

ps. I chose not to post about that info they sent me. lol. I figured sure others might, but I wont contribute to it. ha
 
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Jul 20, 2016
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My daughter who loves movies, and I try to impress on her the importance of films, the experience etc. As much as she does truly enjoy all that, she has no problem in just laying in bed watching crap on her phone. Times I catch her on netflix etc on her phone. All the while there is plenty of tv's in the house with a bigger screen and better sound to watch this all. Its just that habit of growing up with phones and its good enough for them. I find it crazy. ha.

That's what I was saying. I don't think the kids growing up today are going to care as much about sound and picture quality like we do.
 
That's what I was saying. I don't think the kids growing up today are going to care as much about sound and picture quality like we do.
I can only hope that for as many that dont, there are many that do.

My daughter doesnt seem to care and she is fortunate enough to be growing up with a library of films around her and a great sound system. lol. I can only hope its one of those things where people are more attracted to what they dont have, or what is taboo. So maybe she doesnt care as much because of it. *shrug*

She does love the theater experience tho, and IMAX etc. She knows the diff types of quality in that regard in which she likes.

Home entertainment, not as much.

And studios are just gonna squeeze people so much that it will hurt them in the end. Every studio thinks they have to have their own streaming services instead of putting them under one banner. Netflix became so popular because of that model. Paramount has their own streaming service, Disney+ is coming, DC just launched one, Criterion I believe has one coming, I think Warner archive is coming back with one, then there is Hulu, Amazon Prime, and others.

Seems like it will be more smart for people to seek out other services like a shudder who only license based on genre but you get stuff from all the studios. Granted I guess the big 3 in Netflix, Prime and Hulu should be enough.

I want to do what @C.C. 95 mentioned a while back tho and create my own server (think you mentioned plex) ... I just need to get educated and learn how to rip my blu-rays. Cause you can grab blu-rays up for cheap and many will only get cheaper and I could build my digital library on my own and have control over it and perhaps just put the discs in a cd binder or resell. This is more about the movies that arent worth displaying and thus can save more space for the collectible ones etc. Cause I have a HUGE amount of movies now and I have a good feeling that when I next move (out of state) that my next house won't have as much "me" space lol. So I'll need to slim some stuff down. But my first love (when not talking about females :p) is and has always been to have a movie library of sorts. the collection etc. But I also love collectibles, so my future will be a mixture of both but I foresee needing to be crafty with space and or practical in slimming some down. The whole server thought was more about the plastic amaray editions. As that would free up a lot of shelf space for the future. ;)
 
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C.C. 95

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I agree with what you are saying @C.C. 95 but the only big differnce with the kids today is that why yes you will have some that seek out film and film history etc. That'll never stop. However 20 years ago there was no YouTube. There is a large amount of kids who instead of only having tv and movies also have the option to watch random vlogger videos and by the simple availability of more options in regards to media you create more habits by the younger generation in how they consume it.

My daughter who loves movies, and I try to impress on her the importance of films, the experience etc. As much as she does truly enjoy all that, she has no problem in just laying in bed watching crap on her phone. Times I catch her on netflix etc on her phone. All the while there is plenty of tv's in the house with a bigger screen and better sound to watch this all. Its just that habit of growing up with phones and its good enough for them. I find it crazy. ha.

Where I believe the future is heading is where we will truly suffer. I own an Oculus Go, and while its impressive, what is more impressive is what it will be in the future as they get better and better with VR. its not perfect yet video quality wise, but its very good. Hollywood doesnt like the strangle hold (at times) that theaters have. Sadly I definitely see VR as being theater killers in the future.

I had a PR firm send me some stuff they wanted me to post about and promote in that it was VR and basically it was people logging in together sitting at their home in virtual theaters watching the new movies. While I can understand the pro's of that ... its still kind of sad to think about. I dont think you can ever kill off the true experience of watching a movie in a crowd of people, but one has to think that 20 years from now when its all super amazing quality and online rooms where you likely will be able to still hear audience laughter etc. but have the ability to mute the annoying dude that it will no doubt kill off many theaters. There has already been live streamed Q&A's with Directors to other theaters and being to tap that into an online experience outside of the theaters with being able to sell many more tickets is something I see them doing for the dollars. But if big theaters cant put butts in seats they will lose too much money for the real estate and thus smaller theaters are likely the future.

It'll be interesting to watch it all progress in my lifetime. There is a theaters association tho so I'm sure they wont go out without a fight.

ps. I chose not to post about that info they sent me. lol. I figured sure others might, but I wont contribute to it. ha
My o my - if the future is Oculus and VR headsets, we will see a dramatic rebirth of the cat burgler! VR goggles on, Headset on - sitting duck!!
I heard about this new dealio about EDA artist having concerts INSIDE a streaming videogame. Imagine meeting your virtual girlfriend at the show, getting into a virtual fistfight, or getting your first whiff of virtual pot and asking your virtual parents what it is.
Don't forget to buy a virtual t-shirt!!:rofl:
Imagine if a someone came into your house and kidnapped your family. Could you actually tell the cops "I didn't see or hear anything. I was at a concert"?!
I can not prognosticate where, exactly, we are heading with tech and distribution/ exhibition of media.
I DO know that it will flow towards the lucrative avenues. What brings in the $.
I really don't worry myself about it.
Rule #3 for a happy life: Don't worry about things that are completely out of your control.
What I can do (and do do) - is vote with my dollars, and spend time and money on film preservation and exhibition (which I do as a member of the George Eastman Society).
Everything happens in cycles:
I think it is hilarious (and great, in its own way) that people are geeking out about podcasts serials....
Which is basically the same thing as listening to OLD RADIO SHOWS from the 30's, 40's, and 50's!
One wrinkle that could make all of this interesting with theatrical:
There is a gambit afoot where some studios might own their own theater chains. That would be interesting.
Interesting to note, re: VR - that VR was supposed to take hold a while ago...and has been an abject failure. I mean, I still don't have any VR stuff and I get everything!:rofl: (Maybe I just can't get over the creepy disembodied hands in every game.:hilarious:)
But, I think it is important to keep focus on the fact that the rise of certain technologies doesn't mean the death of another.
We have this gorilla mindset right now that everything is ONE or The OTHER, and they cannot exist in the same space. Silly.
 

C.C. 95

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Sep 10, 2014
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I can only hope that for as many that dont, there are many that do.

My daughter doesnt seem to care and she is fortunate enough to be growing up with a library of films around her and a great sound system. lol. I can only hope its one of those things where people are more attracted to what they dont have, or what is taboo. So maybe she doesnt care as much because of it. *shrug*

She does love the theater experience tho, and IMAX etc. She knows the diff types of quality in that regard in which she likes.

Home entertainment, not as much.

And studios are just gonna squeeze people so much that it will hurt them in the end. Every studio thinks they have to have their own streaming services instead of putting them under one banner. Netflix became so popular because of that model. Paramount has their own streaming service, Disney+ is coming, DC just launched one, Criterion I believe has one coming, I think Warner archive is coming back with one, then there is Hulu, Amazon Prime, and others.

Seems like it will be more smart for people to seek out other services like a shudder who only license based on genre but you get stuff from all the studios. Granted I guess the big 3 in Netflix, Prime and Hulu should be enough.

I want to do what @C.C. 95 mentioned a while back tho and create my own server (think you mentioned plex) ... I just need to get educated and learn how to rip my blu-rays. Cause you can grab blu-rays up for cheap and many will only get cheaper and I could build my digital library on my own and have control over it and perhaps just put the discs in a cd binder or resell. This is more about the movies that arent worth displaying and thus can save more space for the collectible ones etc. Cause I have a HUGE amount of movies now and I have a good feeling that when I next move (out of state) that my next house won't have as much "me" space lol. So I'll need to slim some stuff down. But my first love (when not talking about females :p) is and has always been to have a movie library of sorts. the collection etc. But I also love collectibles, so my future will be a mixture of both but I foresee needing to be crafty with space and or practical in slimming some down. The whole server thought was more about the plastic amaray editions. As that would free up a lot of shelf space for the future. ;)
Don't get rid of the Blu rays even if you have a server! A server is simply a convinience. It's still a hard drive (albiet with backups).
I just don't trust that stuff at all for FINAL copy. I see the server as another redundancy. But it is a pretty cool thing to have your entire collection of music and movies at your fingertips from anywhere in the world - plus your friends can watch anything in your collection on your "channel". (No more loans that don't come back!:LOL:). But it is still just a HDD array....and subject to issues that come with Drives...
If I come over to your house with a big ass magnet - you wont be very happy:LOL:.
If there is no disc rot, your blu rays should last your lifetime, easily. The biggest issue, as you mentioned - is space....get a Bigger house.;):rofl:
It's the only answer! Because, like you - I also collect figs, posters, (and also musical instruments). And I can't put those on a hard drive!
I do prune my movie collection yearly, though. I find it easy to select the ones that are "one time watches" and let them go.
 
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C.C. 95

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Yeah I would never just trust a hard drive @C.C. 95 , but my thought plan was always to double that up in case one fails. I will always support physical media tho, its in my blood.
Well, you would be backed up anyway - depending on the type of Array you would choose for the server. You could set it up for as much redundancy as you want. I'm hyper-vigilante (to a fault) - I have backups of backups.
The interest thing about folks who go with digital files is it becomes "out of sight out of mind".
I see all my movies when I pass my bookcases. I can identify movies by their artwork.
I don't go strolling 10 files deep into my computer files.
I think one has more chance of pulling a movie from a bookcase on a whim. (It's so easy to forget movies buried in folders).
But, you can (with work) set up your server to actually look like Netfix, with menus and posters, etc.
I will mainly use mine for all the digital files and music that already live in my hard drives- I have no plans to try and rip over 2000 movies from my collection! And, I would watch off blu ray on my Oppo anyway. The server I see as a convinience for when I am NOT in my viewing room.
(And sharing with friends will be nice).
It's interesting that the safest place for your movies is still on a blu ray disc in a plastic case on your bookshelf.:D
 

Savage Clown

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I have no plans to try and rip over 2000 movies from my collection!
Why? I ripped 1800 twice over, one at h264 codec to mkv for my home media server and then again at h265 codec to mkv for a portable HDD I can take on the go with a portable version of MPC Home Cinema. I also have over 80 bands each with complete discographies ripped to FLAC for the purest fidelity on my media server too.
 

C.C. 95

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Why? I ripped 1800 twice over, one at h264 codec to mkv for my home media server and then again at h265 codec to mkv for a portable HDD I can take on the go with a portable version of MPC Home Cinema. I also have over 80 bands each with complete discographies ripped to FLAC for the purest fidelity on my media server too.
God bless!:thumbs: I wish I had the time!
 
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AlienKing

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No.
Samung just has issues. The 4K blu ray market is increasing not decreasing.
They may just want to spend all their capitol on their TVs instead of players.
Funny, I just saw Sumsung introduce their 8K TV in a local flyer last week. It's 85" and only $19, 999 CAD :rofl:
Yea i think they wanna focus on TVs and cellphones. As I also saw (on YT) they unveil their foldable phone/tablet (i guess you could call it a ...phablet?) for $2000 USD :coffee:

I live in a city about 45 minutes away from downtown Toronto, Canada. I believe there are about 200,000 people here.
I feel like you told me before, but where again?

Why? I ripped 1800 twice over, one at h264 codec to mkv for my home media server and then again at h265 codec to mkv for a portable HDD I can take on the go with a portable version of MPC Home Cinema. I also have over 80 bands each with complete discographies ripped to FLAC for the purest fidelity on my media server too.
Jesus Christ dude! Where do you even get that kind of time? Can I have some? I barely find time to watch a movie + play a game for couple of hrs PER WEEK!!!
 

Savage Clown

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Jesus Christ dude! Where do you even get that kind of time? Can I have some? I barely find time to watch a movie + play a game for couple of hrs PER WEEK!!!
I need me some of that "time creation" technology too!!:LOL:
Actually, I only rip them to file on free time whenever I have it here or a little free time there. This is over the course as I get new BluRay's/Steelbooks I'll just pop it in and start and go to sleep and when I wake up- VIOLA! It also helps to have a completely BEASTLY of a computer so it goes real quick too.
 
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C.C. 95

The Snarky Assassin
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Sep 10, 2014
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The Land, OHIO - U.S.A.
Actually, I only rip them to file on free time whenever I have it here or a little free time there. This is over the course as I get new BluRay's/Steelbooks I'll just pop it in and start and go to sleep and when I wake up- VIOLA! It also helps to have a completely BEASTLY of a computer so it goes real quick too.
Someone needs to modify one of those 400 CD changer/players to auto rip blu rays for servers!:LOL:
AA10BFE0-64DC-4BF2-8CC0-F655635CA897.jpeg
 
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