Mac Mini Review

Savage Clown

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I thought that I'd post this here since this is ideal for a HTPC.

Engadget
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October 23rd was mostly the iPad mini's coming out party; an event with one major headliner. But that newborn product didn't enter Apple's ecosystem alone. Amidst the flurry of announcements, there was one other wee hardware relative on hand ready to join in on the launch festivities: a refreshed 2012 Mac mini. Addressing criticisms of last year's model, Apple added USB 3.0 ports, upgraded to third-generation Ivy Bridge Core processors and boosted the standard RAM allotment to 4GB (you can configure it with up to 16 gigs). Perhaps most interestingly, it's now offering a hybrid storage option, the so-called FusionDrive, which combines flash memory with a SATA HDD.

One quirk still remains, though: the product's demographic leanings. Just who is the Mac mini for? Is it the go-anywhere, portable desktop best integrated in yachts, airports, automobiles and living rooms? Or, with a starting price of $599, is it the perfect, low-cost migration assistant (pun intended) for consumers making the switch from a Windows desktop? Follow on to see which hat this not-quite-an-HTPC wears best.

HARDWARE

Let's not beat around the bush here -- there's a reason Apple plays proud host to a knighted Head of ID: ridiculously gorgeous design. No matter your sworn brand allegiance, you'd be hard-pressed to deny the Mac mini's simple, refined build. It's the tech equivalent of an irresistibly cute baby; the kind of hardware that stops passers-by, prompting compliments. And we're not just saying that figuratively, either. Within our own office environment, we repeatedly entertained questions from nearby officemates who were intrigued by the design. So fill up the comments below with the inevitable accusations of fanboyism, but know that we know that you know that we're right. (It's alright, you can keep it to yourself if you like.)
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Boiled down to its essence, the mini's brushed aluminum enclosure has a wallflower appeal that's at home in a variety of settings; a dash of modernism that should work in many environments. Much of this is due to the unit's diminutive dimensions, which remain unchanged since the mini was redesigned back in 2010. At 7.7 x 7.7 x 1.4 inches, it retains the basic square shape of its two predecessors. It eschews hard angles for softly curved corners, enlivened by the occasional black accent (e.g., the logo on top, the strip around back housing the ports and the removable lid at the base). Users interested in purchasing the optional Apple remote for home entertainment purposes will be glad to know this unit still features an IR receiver. For what's it's worth, you can flip the device on its side should you be faced with space restrictions and need to squeeze it in amongst other office or A/V equipment, but it probably won't look as nice with its circular lid showing.

As much as things change, they seem to stay the same, and that's quite true of this Mac mini refresh. Though a quick glance at its back panel might mislead consumers into believing it's business as usual, there's actually a very significant change at play here -- namely, the addition of high-speed USB 3.0. Otherwise, the ports read from left to right exactly as they did on the 2011 model: power (still integrated), Gigabit Ethernet, FireWire 800, full-sized HDMI, Thunderbolt, 4 x USB 3.0, SDXC slot, audio-in and a 3.5mm headphone jack. Last year, we criticized the company for not including a Thunderbolt dongle in the box, but that critique apparently fell on deaf ears. Instead, we again received the lone HDMI to DVI adapter and that, folks, is just history repeating itself.
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Similarly, Apple remains unmoved in its determination to make just one aspect of the Mac mini swappable, and that would be the unit's expandable memory. Despite the obvious pitfalls associated with HDDs (i.e., the likelihood of potential hardware failure and the like), users that pry open the device's bottom lid will only have access to the two SODIMM slots. The rest is inaccessible (unless you're the DIY type, in which case, have at it!). However, should you require monstrous amounts of RAM, the mini now supports up to 16GB -- so, there's that to smile about. Other than that, this compartment also houses the WiFi radio (AirPort Extreme 802.11n), Bluetooth 4.0 antennas and the cooling fan.

Making the leap from last year's Sandy Bridge processors, the 2012 Mac mini now runs on Intel's third-generation Ivy Bridge Core i5 and i7 CPUs. Our $799 review unit packs a a quad-core i7 clocked at 2.3GHz along with an (optional) 1TB FusionDrive and Intel HD 4000 graphics and 4GB RAM. Consumers with more basic computing needs can opt for the base unit with a dual-core i5 CPU and a 500GB hard drive. This features the same clock speed, graphics solution and memory allotment, but for a lower price of $599. There's also a $999 server option geared towards enterprise and power users, which is similar to the high-end consumer model but has dual 1TB SATA drives.

PERFORMANCE

Since the model Apple shipped us for review is designated as the top-end consumer configuration -- what with its quad-core core i7 and hybrid FusionDrive -- we decided to stress it to the utmost and use it as our daily workstation. From a cold boot off the SSD, it took the system 12 seconds to reach the startup screen, which is on par with the MacBook Air (last year's Sandy Bridge model, even). The mini ships with OS X Mountain Lion pre-installed, as well as the iLife suite, and indeed, that quad-core CPU is more than enough to handle simple OS actions with aplomb. What we were more keen to test out was its stamina when stressed with an Engadget editor's daily workload.
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On any given day, we keep roughly 10 applications running at all times (e.g.,Photoshop, Tweetdeck, Skitch, Spotify, Evernote and an IRC client, among others), in addition to multiple tabs open within two separate browsers (i.e., Firefox and Chrome). Our jobs depend on this level of multitasking and we're pleased to say that the mini managed that processor strain with a graceful silence. In all instances but one, the unit remained relatively cool to the touch and surprisingly quiet. The only time we ever heard a peep from it was when we added Steam and Blizzard game downloads to the active processes load. Even then, the sound of the whirring fan barely registered above a whisper.

On the gaming front, it should go without saying that Macs aren't necessarily the go-to platform for the latest and greatest studio efforts. Indeed, we've noticed incompatibility with most newer titles thanks to Apple's choice of graphics chip, but for the sake of this review we fired up Diablo III to get a sense of how the Intel HD 4000 GPU fares. With every quality option set to high (Texture, Physics, Shadow, etc.), resolution at 1,280 x 1,024 and fps at 60, we didn't encounter any slowdown or drops in the frame rate. Note, we didn't have the time to engage clusters of baddies (about 50 to 60 onscreen at a time) to truly tap out the system, but with more than a dozen characters onscreen, we observed a frame rate that peaked around 42 fps.
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Benchmark testing backed up our anecdotal assessment: the machine nearly doubles the 2011 model's scores. As you can see in the table above, it yielded average overall Xbench scores of 454, with an average CPU score of 270 and an average thread score of 1,418. In Geekbench, meanwhile, it delivered a result of 10,748.

THE HTPC FACTOR

Don't call it an HTPC. Not because we disagree with that moniker, but because Apple vehemently denies its applicability here. And, because it still lacks an optical drive (and you know how we feel about that). Yet, regardless of what Apple says, we can't shake the feeling that this little box will inevitably make its way into users' living rooms at some point in its life cycle -- it was born this way, people. In fact, this editor couldn't resist the urge to take the mini chez lui and hook it up to a palm-sized 3M projector. Using the easily accessible HDMI port, we had no trouble connecting the device to the projector, and mirroring the contents of our external Thunderbolt display. Mind you, that included 1080p films and TV shows, but also streamed content from Hulu, Netflix and YouTube. We did, however, encounter Bluetooth audio sync issues with our Jambox, forcing us to depend on the mini's able, but far-from-powerful internal speaker. Of course, you can always go the more traditional route and attach it to your HDTV, but if you're aching to make use of that vast DVD library (sorry, Blu-ray owners), then prepare to spring for a SuperDrive. At that point, though, you may as well just enter the MacBook fray. Then again, if a media focus is your bent, you could also go the Apple TV route for a more palatable $99.
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FUSIONDRIVE

Apple's quite pleased with the mini's newest feature, the FusionDrive, even though hybrid storage solutions have been in use for quite some time now. So, what is it exactly? Buzzy marketing term aside, this setup pairs 128GB of flash storage with 1TB of traditional HDD storage. It works like this: from the moment you take it out of the box and start it up, your Mac mini will boot, run and store files using this volume, lending every action that surface speediness. But as time progresses and your storage begins to spill past the SSD's 128GB limit, the FusionDrive kicks in, analyzing user-level actions based on algorithms to determine commonly used files and then allocating them accordingly.
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Say, for example, you're a photo editor who makes heavy use of Aperture, but rarely bothers with iPhoto. Well, over time, the system will acknowledge this usage pattern and relegate iPhoto to the hard disk's slower volume, so Aperture will continue to launch and run quickly from flash. What's more, all of this is done behind-the-scenes when the mini is idle, so users won't notice any changes taking place. In fact, there's no real way to monitor or edit how the system arranges the storage -- it's made to appear as one unified volume.

WRAP-UP

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It's fair to say the Mac mini occupies a special place on the consumer spectrum. Consider it a 3 on our appropriated Kinsey scale of tech-to-consumer affiliations. It's the perfect bridge to all things Apple. Designed, initially, to help make Windows users feel at home within the Mac ecosystem, the mini was offered up as an elegant solution -- a compact desktop that would play nice with people's existing peripherals. But as time wore on, this "appliance Mac" (as one rep put it) took on other uses in enterprise and among power users. Eventually, it wormed its way into all manner of server-based applications: digital signage, airport arrival displays and so on.

The mini could also charm fairly frugal shoppers, though, packing a quad-core Intel Core i7 into the top-end $799 model. Whether you really need the added boost of the 1.12TB FusionDrive depends entirely on your consumption habits, as you can always opt for a perfectly capacious 256GB SSD and call it a day. In fact, that latter option might be more than enough for most. So, where's the rub? Well, that's just it. If you fit the sort of user profile we've been describing, we aren't quite sure there is one. At the end of the day, the mini is destined to sit outside of Apple's public limelight like all the models that have come before it. It's the company's jack-of-all-trades, but a shining star for those in the know.
 
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Jason Bourne

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I running a mac mini with upgraded ram & ssd that came out before the ivy bridge update and honestly its a bargain for what it is in the "mac world". And I have seen some of the older models being used as HTPC setup's and they work great from the looks of it.

After having two iMac's, one macbook pro and now this mini Im 100% all about the mac mini assuming it satisfies your hardware needs. Im planning on getting the new mac mini whenever it comes out in the future (suppose to get yet another processor update, to the haswell processors) and grabbing the 29" Dell IPS panel with 2560x1080 resolution... should be a good enough setup for myself. I kind of cheaped' out tbh on my current setup and the graphics are struggling.
 

Savage Clown

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I running a mac mini with upgraded ram & ssd that came out before the ivy bridge update and honestly its a bargain for what it is in the "mac world". And I have seen some of the older models being used as HTPC setup's and they work great from the looks of it.

After having two iMac's, one macbook pro and now this mini Im 100% all about the mac mini assuming it satisfies your hardware needs. Im planning on getting the new mac mini whenever it comes out in the future (suppose to get yet another processor update, to the haswell processors) and grabbing the 29" Dell IPS panel with 2560x1080 resolution... should be a good enough setup for myself. I kind of cheaped' out tbh on my current setup and the graphics are struggling.

Yep, I just bought it this morning. Can't wait to try it out. :oohyeah:
 
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Jason Bourne

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Jay I've been meaning to ask, how well does XBMC run on the Mac Mini? You don't have any high def audio issues with it do you? I was reading over at XBMC forums that a couple of people reported high def audio issues with it. :wtf:

Honestly I have heard mostly positive things from people running XBMC on the Mini.... I don't know too much about HTPC's in general so I can't comment or help you out too much. My friend is running a a few years old mini with XBMC and he has no issues with high def audio (I have personally seen DTS HD, True HD, etc. running on it no issues).
 
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Savage Clown

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Honestly I have heard mostly positive things from people running XBMC on the Mini.... I don't know too much about HTPC's in general so I can't comment or help you out too much. My friend is running a a few years old mini with XBMC and he has no issues with high def audio (I have personally seen DTS HD, True HD, etc. running on it no issues).

Cool that's the only thing that had me worried. I think with this new unit I'm getting there's also a free upgrade to OSX Mavericks. :thumbs: I've seen some of the reviews and it looks pretty cool. :cool:

This is essentially my first Mac, I'm not new to Apple because I have both the iPad 3 and iPhone 5 but for a full Mac OS this is my first. :oohyeah:
 

Jason Bourne

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Cool that's the only thing that had me worried. I think with this new unit I'm getting there's also a free upgrade to OSX Mavericks. :thumbs: I've seen some of the reviews and it looks pretty cool. :cool:

This is essentially my first Mac, I'm not new to Apple because I have both the iPad 3 and iPhone 5 but for a full Mac OS this is my first. :oohyeah:

Oh k. Yeah Im already up and running on Mavericks.... so far quite nice indeed. Well good luck with your new mini :thumbs:
 
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dipzy

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Nice review :)

I purchased the dual core i5 model. Was a good replacement for my aging 20" late 2006 imac.

Yesterday i installed a 256GB SSD for the OS and programs. The 500GB was then used for data. Took a while to take apart while looking at the ifixit guide but all in all it was a pretty smooth process and well worth it. Upgraded the ram from 4GB to 8GB as well

Mavricks runs super quick. Mac mini is an amazing, tiny machine :)
 
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Savage Clown

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When I was buying the Mac Mini I also bought the Magic Trackpad and Magic Keyboard from Mac. I wanted to get the Apple USB SuperDrive but after looking at the specs I noticed it's only a DVD burner and doesn't do Blu-ray at all and it's not even USB 3.0, it's USB 2.0. Such a let down considering all the USB ports on the back of the Mac Mini are USB 3.0 and the new standard is Blu-ray not DVD. :(

I found a seller that sells out from NewEgg (yes I know, I spend all my time at NewEgg :p) called Pawtec. I've also tracked them down at Amazon as well. They've been in business since June 2013 so it's not that long but NewEgg is giving them a shot. Anyways I found a really good UltraSlim External USB 3.0 Slot-Loading BDXL 3D Blu-Ray Writer / Burner For Apple Macbook iMac Mac Mini & PC that's ultra portable too. It's sort of pricey though at $160.


Specs:
The Pawtec UltraSlim External USB 3.0 Slot-Loading BDXL 3D Blu-Ray Writer in silver is a sleek and slim portable external multifunctional drive. It is a must-have accessory for your desktop or laptop allowing you to read and write Blu-Ray, DVD, and CD disc. Now you can watch the latest 3D Blu-Ray movie or backup important files on a Blu-Ray with your Mac or PC. It is the thinnest Blu-Ray writer on the market and is a perfect match for your Apple Macbook and iMac product line.

Thinnest Modern Design and Features
The Pawtec UltraSlim External USB 3.0 Slot-Loading BDXL 3D Blu-Ray Writer is well less than an inch thick and fits virtually anywhere. Constructed out of a top ABS and polycarbonate plastic for durability and an aluminum bottom making this stylish drive durable, lightweight, and portable.

High-Speed Writing and Functionality with USB 3.0
The Pawtec UltraSlim External USB 3.0 Slot-Loading BDXL 3D Blu-Ray Writer features are truly one-of-a-kind. The writer burns CD discs at up to 24x, DVD disc at up to 8x, and Blu-Ray disc at up to 6x. Burn multiple Blu-Ray formats with support of BDXL 100GB and 128GB disc. Watch 3D Blu-Ray movies at home with ease. (Proper setup such as 3D TV/Monitor and glasses is required to in ordered to utilize 3D from 3D movies)

Simple to Use
The plug-n-play feature allows you to simply connect the drive to your computer and have it be automatically detected. With its USB 3.0 capabilities, this drive can transfer up to 10x faster than USB 2.0, yet is still compatible with USB 2.0 and 1.0/1.1.

Technical Details
- USB 3.0 Plug and Play - Works with Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8 and MAC OS X.
- Ability to read and write CD, DVD and Blu-Ray disc. Constructed with industry leading slot loading Blu-Ray writer.
- USB 3.0 – Allows for faster performance while still being compatible with USB 1.0, 1.1, and 2.0.
- Ability to read and write CD, DVD and Blu-Ray discs.
- Constructed with industry leading tray loading Blu-Ray writer.
- Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.7 x 5.5 inches ; 8.3 ounces
- Shipping Weight: 1 pound

Writing Speed
- 24x CDR
- 16x CDRW
- 8x DVD-R
- 8x DVD+R
- 6x DVD-RW
- 8x DVD+RW
- 6x DVD-R DL
- 4x DVD+R DL
- 5x DVD-RAM
- 6x BD-R SL (Blu-Ray Write Single Layer)
- 6x BD-R DL (Blu-Ray Write Dual Layer)
- 4x BD-R TL (Blu-Ray Write Triple Layer)
- 4x BD-R QL (Blu-Ray Write Quad Layer)
- 2x BD-RE SL (Blu-Ray ReWrite Single Layer)
- 2x BD-RE DL (Blu-Ray ReWrite Dual Layer)
- 2x BD-RE TL (Blu-Ray ReWrite Triple Layer)
- XL BD-RE QL (Blu-Ray ReWrite Quad Layer)

Reading Speed
- 6x BD-ROM (Blu-Ray Read)
- 24x CD
- 8x DVD
- 5x DVD-RAM

Has anyone else gotten one of these or this brand at all and if so how good are they? I usually base my buying decisions on other user reviews but this company is so new that there aren't any except for a few at Amazon.

NewEgg
Amazon
 
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Savage Clown

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^^^ Can't help you on that one bud as I have never seen them before. I bought a external Samsung BD drive/writer. Its actually only USB 2.0 but I got a really good deal on it at $65 so I went for it and works great.

I'm still trying to decide if it's worth it or not. I mean the Mac Mini has 4 USB 3.0 ports in the back, if I wanted to install software I could always use them. I have to decide if I want a player to watch Blu-rays with since I already have an Oppo to do that. Do you use yours very much Jay?

There's one thing about the Mac Mini I wish they did differently. I wish they would have put at least one USB 3 port on the front of the unit. Usually ports on the back are intended for peripherals and ports on the front are usually intended for USB thumb drives or similar devices.

I'll have to get a short USB 3 extension cable and run it from the back to the front so I can easily plug in a thumb drive when I need to.

Jay have you seen the kit you can get that expands the Mac Mini into a server by adding an extra drive so you have two drives in it? iFixit makes one.
 

Jason Bourne

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I'm still trying to decide if it's worth it or not. I mean the Mac Mini has 4 USB 3.0 ports in the back, if I wanted to install software I could always use them. I have to decide if I want a player to watch Blu-rays with since I already have an Oppo to do that. Do you use yours very much Jay?

There's one thing about the Mac Mini I wish they did differently. I wish they would have put at least one USB 3 port on the front of the unit. Usually ports on the back are intended for peripherals and ports on the front are usually intended for USB thumb drives or similar devices.

I'll have to get a short USB 3 extension cable and run it from the back to the front so I can easily plug in a thumb drive when I need to.

Jay have you seen the kit you can get that expands the Mac Mini into a server by adding an extra drive so you have two drives in it? iFixit makes one.

Nope I don't use it much tbh... mostly just got it to use as a computer BD drive for you know what.

Yes, I too am annoyed by no USB ports on the front but this is a case of Apple choosing style over substance. I have a powered USB hub personally.

No haven't seen those ifixit kits...
 

Jason Bourne

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Interesting. Well I can tell you that if you take your time its very do-able. The Mini is cramped so it is a bit harder to work with but its do-able. I swapped the regular HDD that came in my mini with a SSD and Im no tech genius and I was able to do it just fine. There is no doubt there is extra space where the hard drive sits for two of them to slot in just fine. Any issues with heat you think as a result though... ?
 

Savage Clown

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Interesting. Well I can tell you that if you take your time its very do-able. The Mini is cramped so it is a bit harder to work with but its do-able. I swapped the regular HDD that came in my mini with a SSD and Im no tech genius and I was able to do it just fine. There is no doubt there is extra space where the hard drive sits for two of them to slot in just fine. Any issues with heat you think as a result though... ?

Well I was watching How-To videos on YT on how to do it and they said that all Mac Mini's are designed the same whether they are the i5, i7 or i7 Server, the only difference is that the regular editions are just without the extra drive. As far as heat goes you have that heat blower fan that dissapates all the heat in the unit. Also if you've got SSD drives you won't have any heat issues.
 
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Jason Bourne

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Well I was watching How-To videos on YT on how to do it and they said that all Mac Mini's are designed the same whether they are the i5, i7 or i7 Server, the only difference is that the regular editions are just without the extra drive. As far as heat goes you have that heat blower fan that dissapates all the heat in the unit. Also if you've got SSD drives you won't have any heat issues.

Yeah makes sense. I personally used the OWC video I think when I did mine as a guide.