1917 (4K+2D Blu-ray SteelBook) (Fanatic Selection No.4) [Hong Kong]

MM3

Jul 8, 2016
653
Apparently this will help.

View attachment 480166
I see now. Would make sense if they pointed that out in the beauty shots, but I just noticed it was mentioned in previous posts. Obviously, we don't always have time to look at all the pages in these forums. I have a life. :LOL:

Not sure I like this concept. Will anyone bother to change the cards? It's not like people are going to be changing the cards from time to time.

On another note, I don't understand why all these slips open on the wrong side. The opening on slips should be always be on the right, not the left. It makes the front seem likes it's actually the back. Just something I always wondered. I suppose it works for the few people who are left handed.
 
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steelmybeatingheart

makes the questions and he does the answers
Premium Supporter
Jul 6, 2016
1,347
London
On another note, I don't understand why all these slips open on the wrong side. The opening on slips should be always be on the right, not the left. It makes the front seem likes it's actually the back. Just something I always wondered. I suppose it works for the few people who are left handed.
Chinese books also open the same way, the opposite of Western books; you read right to left (and bottom to top) in traditional Mandarin, not left to right, so it makes perfect sense. if you are Chinese. :)
 

Actarus

Premium Supporter
Mar 28, 2014
10,948
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4K UHD Review from the DigitalBits

1917 (Reference Title)
Worth reading the review if you don’t know what to expect from the UHD :thumbs:

1917 was captured digitally in the ARRIRAW codec (at 4.5K) using the Arri Alexa Mini LF camera (newly made and the smallest available with a large format sensor) with Arri Signature Prime lenses. It was finished as a native 4K digital intermediate at the 2.39:1 aspect ratio (1.90 for IMAX presentation, not included here) and graded for high dynamic range (Dolby Vision, HDR10 and HDR10+ are all available here). The Ultra HD image is—in a word—spectacular, but it reveals its virtues by degree and over time. The film’s color palette is strongly muted, as you might expect of a WWI film—much of it takes place under overcast skies, in muddy trenches, or on gloomy battlefields. But the sheer variety and shadings of gray, blue, brown, khaki, and the odd splashes of green or dark red are remarkable. This is a film grounded in texture—mud, dirt, wool, leather, canvas, tin, brass—and the refinement of each is impressive. Shadows are deeply black, but never lack for detail, while the highlights are oppressively gloomy. The film’s nighttime scenes, set in the bombed out village of Écoust-Saint-Mein, are remarkable studies in light and shadow, always in motion for being lit by soaring aerial flares or building fires. There’s a bit of banding visible in the monotone skies in HDR10, particularly when Schofeld and Blake first cross No Man’s Land, but the extra two bits of Dolby Vision cleans this up nicely. In any case, this is very close to a reference quality 4K image, but not a showy one. It’s a symphony of subtleties infused with breathtaking moments of stark beauty.