Six Days in Fallujah - Megathread - New Konami Game! - NOT CANCELLED!

Jan 29, 2009
7,187
Upcoming new FPS titled “Six Days in Fallujah” will be based on the current on-going war in Iraq.

six-days-in-fallujah-game.jpg
 
Jan 29, 2009
7,187
I think we all knew this was coming when Konami announced their upcoming new FPS titled “Six Days in Fallujah” will be based on the current on-going war in Iraq. Already, there has been complaints since the game was first mentioned on April 6. You can check out the announcement here.

The U.K.’s Daily Mail reports complaints about Six Days in Fallujah by the father of a Royal Marine who died in the Iraq War. Reg Keys, whose son Thomas was killed in 2003, said:

Considering the enormous loss of life in the Iraq War, glorifying it in a video game demonstrates very poor judgement and bad taste… These horrific events should be confined to the annals of history, not trivialised and rendered for thrill-seekers to play out…

It’s entirely possible that Muslim families will buy the game, and for them it may prove particularly harrowing. Even worse, it could end up in the hands of a fanatical young Muslim and incite him to consider some form of retaliation or retribution…

I will be calling for this game to be banned, if not worldwide then certainly in the UK.

Meanwhile, former colonel Tim Collins OBE, a decorated Iraq War veteran, was equally aghast:

It’s much too soon to start making video games about a war that’s still going on, and an extremely flippant response to one of the most important events in modern history. It’s particularly insensitive given what happened in Fallujah, and I will certainly oppose the release of this game.

Tech Radar offers withering comments from Tansy Hoskins of Stop The War Coalition, a U.K. peace group:

The massacre carried out by American and British forces in Fallujah in 2004 is amongst the worst of the war crimes carried out in an illegal and immoral war. It is estimated that up to 1,000 civilians died in the bombardment and house to house raids…

The American led assault on Fallujah pretended there were no civilians left in the city [but] over 50,000 people remained in their homes and took the brunt of the violence and chemical weapons…

To make a game out of a war crime and to capitalise on the death and injury of thousands is sick… The massacre in Fallujah should be remembered with shame and horror not glamorised and glossed over for entertainment.

As of now, Konami and Atomic Games will still be going forward with the game, but if any more complaints arise, Konami will be facing some serious protesting soon. Such a big gamble on Konami’s part don’t you think?

Source: gossipgamers.com/outrage-over-konamis-new-game-six-days-in-fallujah/
 
Last edited:
Jan 28, 2009
5,035
Manteca, CA
Isn't that what COD and other Shooter games have done? Some just not as specific. Although, I understand where they are coming from. Without getting to political about it, it is a current war we are in and it is fresh in peoples minds. Especially a parent of someone that died or someone that has been there.
 

thunda123

Premium Supporter
I really don't have any problems with them making this game. So many people these days just need something/anything to protest to somehow make life feel better to them. My philosophy is that if you don't like it, don't buy it and don't worry about it. The game really has no effect on anything unless these people allow it to.
 
Jan 29, 2009
7,187
I really don't have any problems with them making this game. So many people these days just need something/anything to protest to somehow make life feel better to them. My philosophy is that if you don't like it, don't buy it and don't worry about it. The game really has no effect on anything unless these people allow it to.

exactly.
 
I really don't have any problems with them making this game. So many people these days just need something/anything to protest to somehow make life feel better to them. My philosophy is that if you don't like it, don't buy it and don't worry about it. The game really has no effect on anything unless these people allow it to.

Damn brother you are right on the spot!! I am with you 100% if something bothers you then simply ignore it, don't buy it or don't tune into it. People find excuses to protest, but like Miguel said it might cause issues as families of the fallen soldiers might find it bad for this game to be released.
 

mobius387

beer snob
Premium Supporter
Feb 16, 2009
4,404
Milwaukee, WI
Considering the enormous loss of life in the Iraq War, glorifying it in a video game demonstrates very poor judgement and bad taste…

if you are going to protest a game, at least give a reason that actually makes sense. does this guy have a problem with games about WWI or WWII? im pretty sure more people died during those wars.

It’s entirely possible that Muslim families will buy the game, and for them it may prove particularly harrowing. Even worse, it could end up in the hands of a fanatical young Muslim and incite him to consider some form of retaliation or retribution…

that is one of the problems with this world IMO and specifically this country. too often we are trying to please everyone and too often everyone expects to be pleased.

to be honest, the market is already saturated with war games especially realistic ones. this one getting banned wouldnt be that big of a deal.
 
if konami was smart theyd change the title, simply put.

It is too soon to be making games named it because then you draw the public crowd intothe gaming world which they know nothing about just to protest.... but its been done plenty of times over as we all know ,,, modern warfare is the same thing, just didnt have a war specific name in it.
 
Jan 29, 2009
7,187
Konami Digital Entertainment Co. has decided to pull a videogame that realistically reproduces the bloody street battles between U.S. forces and terrorists and insurgents in Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004.

"After seeing the reaction to the videogame in the United States and hearing opinions sent through phone calls and e-mail, we decided several days ago not to sell it," a public relations official of Konami said. "We had intended to convey the reality of the battles to players so that they could feel what it was like to be there."

"Six Days in Fallujah," developed by U.S. company Atomic Games, was showcased earlier this month at an event in the United States for magazines specializing in the videogame industry.

Konami had planned to put the game on sale in or after 2010.

However, bereaved families of soldiers, retired troops and citizens' groups in the United States and Europe criticized the game as in poor taste and insensitive.

The fighting in Fallujah in November 2004 was among the most intense after the U.S.-led war against Iraq's regular forces ended in 2003. More than 2,000 people, including many citizens, were killed in the street battles over several weeks.

In "Six Days in Fallujah," gamers play the roles of U.S. Marines deployed on the streets to wipe out the enemy. In some situations, the players must decide whether to shoot unarmed people.

Jamin Brophy-Warren, a journalist for the Wall Street Journal and a specialist on videogames, reported that about 40 U.S. soldiers who saw action in Fallujah helped in the production of the videogame by, for example, offering their diaries and journals to Atomic Games.

The times of the battles, the locations of troops and other details in the game are extremely close to what had actually happened in Fallujah, Brophy-Warren reported.

The reporter also said several thousand photos, including satellite images classified by the U.S. military, were used in the production of "Six Days in Fallujah."

"We think Atomic Games used a network (to produce the game)," the Konami official said. "But we don't know the connection (between the company and U.S. military forces)."(IHT/Asahi: April 27,2009)


Source: asahi.com/english/Herald-asahi/TKY200904270177.html
 
Jan 29, 2009
7,187
Six Days in Fallujah, which aims to tell the story of the recent battle in Iraq, was too hot a political potato for one-time publishers Konami, who facing intense pressure dumped the game.

But that doesn't mean the project is dead.

Developers Atomic Games still see promise in the project, and are still shopping the game around to prospective publishers, boss Peter Tamte telling Newsweek ""We have a lot of people who are interested in the project...But I'll feel better when we sign something and the checks start coming."

The Newsweek piece is also worth reading to get the full rundown on Atomic's treatment of the more sensitive aspects of the game, including lessons learned and the finer details of the developer's collaboration with members of the US armed forces.